Thursday, November 30, 2006

Compassion for tigers

Compassion for tigers

I am concerned for a tiger. I hope he understands the sincerity of my question.
It was not intended as a trap. But he seems to have made it into one and fallen deeply into it.

The background is as follows.

A teacher (an Elephant) and student (a Tiger) have had a difference of opinion on different subjects and their relation to Buddhism. This has created strife for a long time in an online community that I have been enjoying for quite some time.

For the sake of context I will place the conversations here:

It has been said by a tiger that an elephant holds on to views that are not the teaching of the World Honored One. It has been stated by an elephant that a tiger holds on to views that are not the teaching of the World Honored One. The result to this is great suffering being caused by an elephant to a tiger and to the elephants herd by the tiger.

Can elephants and tigers free themselves from their attachment to views and end the cycle of suffering?

Gassho
Jordan

The Tiger responded:

I think that people who haven’t got enlightenment need not ask or discuss or worry about lesser problems but should ask about enlightenment.

Elephants and tigers who have got it already should make their effort to clarify to others what the method might be.

Wanting to get enlightenment by practicing Zazen, over 25 years I have come up with thousands and thousands of new ideas, competitively one after another, about how I might get my paws on enlightenment.

-End conversation-

I will not respond to this on the Masters blog because this is the exact type of thing that disrupts the community.

To the tiger I say I am sorry that you have fallen into this trap. My intention was only to free you.

I have yet to here from the elephant.

For clarification relating to what the tiger has said to me:

I am not seeking enlightenment.

I am concerned about constructing an enjoyable and valuable dialogue about Buddhism.

Great apologies to suffering tigers every ware.

Gassho
Jordan

7 Comments:

Blogger oxeye said...

Jordan - chodo's problem is fascinating.. he is like a paper moth above a fire.

Thursday, 30 November, 2006  
Blogger Jordan & The Tortoise said...

Oxeye,
Your comment pierced the truth but my heart was hiding behind it and was scratched by the lance.

When he posted as he did he was showing his stripes. I hope he can shed them and his animal form.

I would invite him to my house and happily spoon-feed him if it took that to help him see what he already has. My fear in that is that he may choke on the spoon.

The Priory has a ceremony (I have not been a big fan of ceremonies) called a transfer of merit. I think I understand its value much more now.

Please have compassion for Chodo. He is deeply wounded and is having trouble reaching the medicine he needs.

Gassho
Jordan

Thursday, 30 November, 2006  
Blogger oxeye said...

J - I used to try and engage him but he is rightly proud and very combative. I have never reacted well to those traits and made things worse by being less than kind to him. Now I leave him alone and try to pay more attention to my own issues.

That is about as compassionate as it gets.

Friday, 01 December, 2006  
Blogger Jordan & The Tortoise said...

Oxeye,
“Now I leave him alone and try to pay more attention to my own issues.”

This reminds me of the Antaiji homepage, There is a banner that scrolls across the screen that says something like "What are you gawking at, don't you know it is all about you"

I find in my practice it is all about me, and the whole universe I am a part of.

Gassho
Jordan

Friday, 01 December, 2006  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

My son and I have a story that we have enjoyed since he was about 3 years old. It is called, The Old Man and the Tiger.

In the story a tiger steps into a trap, an old man hears him calling for help and lets him out. The tiger immediately makes his intentions known that he will now eat the old man. A fox comes along and helps the old man by tricking the tiger back into the trap. The old man, and everyoned else is then safe.

Gassho, Ted

Friday, 01 December, 2006  
Blogger MikeDoe said...

The traditional solution for a dangerous tiger was to kill it.

However, although both may roar a tiger and a wounded animal are different beasts.

Another dangerous beast story is "Androcles and the Lion".

All of that being said I don't really see any benefit in discussion of blog events elsewhere.

We can each make our own judgements and from that place we may each choose to act accordingly.

Of course, none of our judgements may be right or our actions accurate or right but each must still act or not as they see fit.

Saturday, 02 December, 2006  
Blogger Jordan & The Tortoise said...

Ted,
I am familiar with the story,
I think the analogy is 80% right.

Thank you for giving me something to Consider.


Mikedoe,

I wish this had played out more like "Androcles and the Lion". Maby in time it will.

“All of that being said I don't really see any benefit in discussion of blog events elsewhere.”

This was important enough to me, and I thought the lesson was and still is valuable. I am still learning from it. I am slow…


“Of course, none of our judgments may be right or our actions accurate or right but each must still act or not as they see fit.”

I think intentions are the guts of action.

Thank you for your comments.


Gassho!
Jordan

Saturday, 02 December, 2006  

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